Three salvaged American white pelicans have been released on the Irvine – Orange County Register

Three American white pelicans slowly scanned their surroundings and blew up with a little encouragement at Mason Regional Park in Irvine on Friday.

The birds had recovered at the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center in Huntington Beach for the past six months. All are around a year old.

  • Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center volunteers watch a newly released American white pelican head towards the water in Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The center has released three pelicans who they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Debbie McGuire, executive director of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center (right), joins volunteers as they prepare to release American white pelicans in Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021 for six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • An American white pelican damaged by fishing line will be released in Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center has released three pelicans that they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Three newly released American white pelicans examine their surroundings before departing Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center has released three pelicans that they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Debbie McGuire, General Manager of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, encourages the newly released American white pelicans to fly away at Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The center has released three pelicans who they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Two out of three just released American white pelicans will take to the air at Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center has released three pelicans that they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Volunteer Riley Whitney of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center releases an American white pelican in Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The center has released three pelicans who they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • A newly released American white pelican will take off in the air at Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center has released three pelicans that they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Two of the three American white pelicans that have just been released are investigating their surroundings before departing Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center has released three pelicans that they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Three newly released American white pelicans examine their surroundings before departing Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center has released three pelicans that they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

  • Debbie McGuire, General Manager of the Wetlands and Wildlife Care Center, encourages the newly released American white pelicans to fly away at Mason Regional Park on Thursday, April 23, 2021. The center has released three pelicans who they have nursed back to health over the past six months. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register / SCNG)

One found around Thanksgiving was nicknamed Butterball. It was malnourished and small for its age.

The other two had been injured by fishing lines. One had to operate on the blade on the underside of the beak, while the other had parts of the feet removed because they were damaged.

Debbie McGuire, the center’s executive director, said she wanted to make sure the birds are released in time for their annual migration to Colorado.

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